Let’s Talk – World Suicide Prevention

The month of September marks World Suicide Prevention month, but mental health isn’t just a topic that needs attention one month or one day of the year, it’s a 365 days a year issue; so let’s talk about it!

Every 40 seconds, someone around the world commits suicide. In the US alone there are 132 suicides on average each day. These statistics are alarming and something that can be prevented by ending the stigma around mental illness and getting help.

TAKE CARE OF YOUR MENTAL HEALTH

The stress of 2020 alone can be taking a toll on your mental health and you are not alone. It’s important to take steps towards real self-care and addressing these issues.

  • Talk to a friend – Pick up your phone, create a Zoom or Teams call, meet up at a park or outside your home, whatever the method is, go talk to a friend or family member you can trust and ask them to listen. Let them know how you’re feeling, oftentimes this helps alleviate the stresses we hold on our shoulders.
  • Eat well – Food has a huge impact on our mood and cognition. Not getting a specific nutrient can affect your mental health! In fact, researchers have found that poor diets play a role in worsening mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression. It’s important to put food in your body that doesn’t just make you feel better in the moment, but also the next day.
  • Meditate or Take A Break – Oftentimes, we’re too busy running around, thinking too much about changes we need to make, or wondering what the future looks like that we forget to slow down and take a breath. It’s critical to give yourself time to decompress and live in the now. You can take a walk, meditate for a few minutes, try out yoga, or work on some breathing exercises, whatever you can do to force yourself to slow down.
  • Stay Active – Your physical health affects your mental health! If you are not taking care of your body, this can easily affect your mood and stress levels. Even by just moving your body for 30-60 minutes, three days a week can help relieve stress and sleep better. Exercise can not cure depression, anxiety, or other mental illnesses but it can help boost your overall mood and provide an additional outlet to manage your mental health.
  • Go Outside –  Time spent outside may have a positive impact on your mental health! Some studies have shown that nature can lift your mood or lower anxiety. So take a minute to step outdoors and reduce your screen time!

HOW TO HELP OTHERS

Helping others is also critical we can’t all go through this alone.

  • Check-In! Ask Questions – If you know someone who may be struggling or if you don’t know, it’s important to check-in and ask! Everyone shows emotions differently and they may be struggling on the inside and hoping someone will reach out to help.
  • Help Them Connect – Help them connect with others who can support them, either through an online group or a local chapter. Having a support group that has felt what they are feeling or helping them find the resources they need for professional guidance can make a significant impact.
  • Follow Up and Keep Showing Up – It’s easy to check in on your friends once but it’s important to keep checking in on your friends. Keep the conversation going! Consistency can make a world of difference for someone that is struggling.

RESOURCES

Did you know your WCUI Student Services team is also here to help? They are always available to be the listening ear and can help you connect with resources in your area to support you, your education, or your health. Connect with them:

In addition, there are a lot of wonderful foundations and programs available if you are in need, want to help someone in need, or are looking to advocate for suicide prevention. We’ve made a short list here, but your Student Services team can also help you find a resource for your specific needs:

There is no judgment. You are not alone. So let’s keep talking.

This year, the CDC is recommending everyone receive the flu shot this flu season​. The vaccine will help protect yourself and the people around you from the  flu. In addition, the flu shot can help reduce the impact on healthcare systems currently fighting to protect our communities from COVID-19. Call your healthcare provider or connect with your local pharmacy today to learn more about the flu shot and schedule an appointment before the flu season is upon us!

Where Can I Get a Flu Shot?

In addition to connecting with your healthcare provider, you can use the below resources to find a clinic and schedule a flu shot. Most insurance companies will cover the cost of the flu shot, but there are low-cost options for those without healthcare insurance:

Why Should I Get A Flu Shot?

Flu shots can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu.  In addition, the vaccine can help protect others in your community who are at higher risk to have flu-related hospitalizations and deaths. With the current pandemic still underway, it’s important to reduce the number of respiratory illnesses, like the flu from spreading throughout your community and potentially threatening the health of yourself and others.

Who Can Get a Flu Shot?

Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu shot every flu season with rare exceptions. More information on who should and who should not get a flu vaccine is available on the CDC website.

When Should I Get My Flu Shot?

The CDC recommends getting your flu shot before flu viruses begin spreading in your community. This is because it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against the flu. Be sure to make plans to get vaccinated early in fall, before flu season begins. In fact, this year, the CDC recommends getting your flu shot by September or October to provide the best protection at the start of the flu season.

For the most up-to-date information or questions about the flu vaccine, please visit the CDC website and talk with your healthcare provider.

Dear WCUI Community:  

We have created a Coronavirus web page for all our web sites: wcui.edu/coronavirus and we will be updating this page as we receive new information.  

We encourage WCUI students, faculty and staff to check this page routinely for updates.  

As the coronavirus has begun to make a presence in the US, we want to provide some education on the virus and the best means of protection. At WCUI, the health and safety of our students, staff, faculty, and community is crucial and we are monitoring the coronavirus situation carefully. New information about the coronavirus is being updated daily and sometimes hourly on the CDC website. For the most up to date news on the situation please visit: CDC Website

What is the Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

COVID-19, more commonly known as the coronavirus, is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. The virus is a novel coronavirus that was first identified during an outbreak investigation in Wuhan, China. Similar to influenza, the people who are most likely to have severe disease and complications from COVID-19 are older individuals (>60 years old) and those with other medical conditions like heart and lung disease or diabetes. 81% of people diagnosed with COVID-19 in China had mild disease, including most children. 

What are the symptoms?

Current symptoms reported for patients with coronavirus have included mild to severe respiratory illness with:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing/Shortness of breath.

Many patients with severe complications from the virus have developed pneumonia in both lungs.

How Does it Spread?

According to the CDC, person-to-person is the most common way the coronavirus spreads, similar to a cold or the flu. This can happen:

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Or through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
  • People are thought to be most contagious when they present the most symptoms or are the sickest. 
  • Some spread of the virus might be possible before a person has symptoms; there have been reports of this with COVID-19, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. 
  • It may be possible that a person to contract the disease by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is also not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

How do I protect myself from COVID-19 (Coronavirus)?

Healthy Hygiene wash your hands Healthy Hygiene use alcohol based hand sanitizer Healthy Hygiene- If you feel ill stay home Healthy Hygiene- cover your cough or sneeze with your elbow or a tissue 

  • Wash your hands OFTEN with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

    • Especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. To make sure you are washing your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, sing the ABC’s slowly!
  • If you are not able to wash your hands, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol until soap and water are available to wash your hands.

    • Check the label on the back of your hand sanitizer and make sure there is at least 60% alcohol in the ingredients.
    • Make sure to rub the hand sanitizer into your hands for 20 seconds until it is absorbed and dry.
  • STAY HOME if you feel sick! Do NOT go to work or to class!

    • If you become ill, notify your instructor or Campus Director and contact your healthcare provider for instructions on medical care.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. Stay at least 3-6 feet away from anyone showing signs of illness.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

  • Cover your cough or sneeze with your elbow or a tissue and immediately throw the tissue in the trash.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

Travel

We recommend that WCUI students, faculty and staff refrain from non-essential travel, including business or personal, to international and local areas which the CDC has determined to have experienced a “widespread sustained(ongoing) and sustained(ongoing) community transmission” of the COVID-19. If you travel to an area that had previously or during the course of your travels becomes an area of widespread sustained or sustained community transmission, you will be required to self-quarantine for 14 days following your return home by WCUI. For a list of countries with travel advisories, visit travel.state.gov and the CDC website.

Students who self-quarantine as a result of travel to impacted countries will be excused from classes during this period. However, as WCUI School of Medical Imaging and Nursing remains operating as normal, these students will be expected to complete their coursework upon their return. 

Students who have or are going to travel must contact your Campus Director:

Your Health Is a Priority!

We want to make sure everyone at WCUI is healthy and safe. Since we are also in peak flu season it is important to take precautions and take care of your hygiene and health. Wash your hands with soap and water frequently, avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth, and STAY HOME if you feel ill. If you become sick, contact your healthcare provider before going to the hospital/clinic and discuss your symptoms. It is crucial to take care of yourself or you could risk worsening your symptoms or infecting others with the flu and other respiratory illnesses. If you have any questions about missing classes or labs due to illness, please contact your instructor or your Campus Director. 

 

For more resources about the Coronavirus (COVID-19) and protecting your health and those around you, please visit:

The World Health Organization: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Helpful documents and videos: 

What you need to know about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)

What to do if you are sick with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)

World Health Organization (WHO) – What is Coronavirus Video

CDC Handwashing Video

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